Preparing for the Fourth of July

The Fourth of July is one of the hardest times of year for our dogs.  It is hot, there are many events, and, there are fireworks.  Here are some tips for getting through this time of year successfully.

  1. Leave your dog at home.  As fun as it is to have our dogs with us at picnics or events, it is often stressful for the dogs.  Add in the risks of open gates, dropped leashes, unsafe foods being out and about, hot weather, thunderstorms, the stress of new environments, excited children, and fireworks, leaving your dog at home is often the safest bet, and where they would rather be if given the choice.
  2. Make sure they have an ID tag and their microchip info is up to date. The Fourth of July is one of the biggest days of the year for lost dogs.  Dogs get spooked by fireworks, or gates are left open at family events – and if your dog is on the run, you want to make sure they have current and up to date information that is still readable.  It doesn’t hurt to make sure their license is up to date as well, as another way to ensure your dog gets back to you safe and sound.
  3. If your dog gets out, know what to do.  I already have a post about what to do if your dog is lost, check it out and make sure you are prepared.
  4. Plan ahead!  Know when the fireworks are going to be going off and make sure you get your walks in ahead of time.  If you suspect your neighbors might be setting them off, plan for a day with the windows closed, the air conditioner on, and keep the TV, radio or white noise playing to keep things as quiet inside as possible.  Get an awesome marrow bone, some bully sticks, make sure there is a frozen Kong ready to keep your dog entertained and focused on something other then the noise.
  5. Watch the heat! Dogs do not sweat like we do, and can overheat easily.  Do not leave your pets in cars, and watch them when outside.  Especially the black dogs, or dogs with short noses who overheat a lot faster.  Also remember young dogs and older dogs, and dogs with certain medical conditions can be even more sensitive to heat.  So, keep them cool and comfortable.
  6. Talk to your vet.  If your dog is truly phobic, see if there is a medication or supplement that may help.  Some people are reporting success with CBD oil, or supplements containing lactium, but as always, make sure you check with your vet first.
  7. If you have to leave them, leave them safe.  Make sure they are in their crate in a room that is calm and quiet, with something safe for them to do.  Close the windows, pull the shades, blast the air conditioner and leave a white noise machine on, or calming music like Through a Dogs’ Ear.
  8. Do not be afraid to let them know it is okay.  If you are with your dog, and your dog is upset, it is okay to be there for them, and to soothe them and reassure them.  It will not reinforce their fears, it will let them know they are not alone.
  9. Know the closest vet, and emergency vet.  Know which vets near you are open, where the closest vet is, and have their number in your phone.  Heaven forbid an emergency happen you want to know where to go, and how to get there.

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