Quarry Quest

Wag It Games’ Quarry Quest is something I did not get the chance to try with my own dog so when I started to teach it I don’t think I realized how much fun it was, now I am a total convert and I think it may be one of my favorite scent classes!  Best of all the dogs seem to really be loving it too.

While I enjoy all the scent games, particularly the Wag it Games scent games, there is a light bulb moment that seems to come with Quarry Quest that never fails to make me smile.  When it clicks you can see it in the dogs, you can see it in the handlers, and it is so much fun.  The dogs start exploring more, they start picking up speed, and their enjoyment is infectious.

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We just finished up our last round of classes and this time I remembered to take some video!   Which is good because people have been asking me what goes on in class.  The basics are that a course is created, with ins and outs and overs and unders, different surfaces and different heights.  Then we take some containers and hide them.  Some have wool, some have poly-fill, and the dogs have to identify which one has the wool.

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Ally, Bonnie (who was not able to make the last class), Jack and Stella had been working for six weeks and they rocked at Quarry Quest – they were exploring, using their noses and working!  And also having fun.  So proud of this group.

You know it is a good class when it ends with tired, happy dogs.

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Happy Birthday Jackson!

When you are taking Beginning Scent Work on your birthday, sometimes the finds are a little extra special!

 

Happy Birthday Jackson, aka Bubs, aka The Cheese Thief!  And thank you for bringing treats to share with your friends.

And great work to all the dogs in class, I’ll be posting more videos soon – you all worked so hard and had such fun it was wonderful working with you.

Sweet Potato Jerky

If you ask my dogs one of the best things about Thanksgiving is the post-Thanksgiving sales on sweet potatoes, because sweet potatoes mean sweet potato jerky!

When you have a chubby senior pup with a thyroid issue treats can be a problem. Well, as far as the Elkhound is concerned the lack of treats is the problem, for me the problem is more finding things that will leave him satisfied without packing on the pounds, so, sweet potato it is!

You can buy sweet potato jerky or you can make it – it is super simple!

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Just cut your sweet potato into either slices or rounds about 1/4 inch thick – you can go a bit thicker but try not to go smaller, they will burn!  And if you can tell by this picture, they are definitely closer to 1/3 inches then 1/4.  Really getting slices the same thickness is most important so they all dry evenly.  If your knife skills need some practice feel free to cut the sweet potato in half first so you can lay the flat side down on the cutting board so they are easier to cut.  It is what I do!

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Once they are cut lay them out on parchment paper and put them in a 250 degree oven for 3 hours.  The low heat will dry them out and make them nice and chewy, but I suggest turning them at least once half-way through.  I admit to being fidgety and flipping them every half-hour or with the idea it will help them dry out more evenly, but there is no method to that madness.

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When they are done lay them on a rack to cool and watch the dogs gather and beg.

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If you like a crispier treat you can but them back in and dry them out a bit longer, no more then a half-hour more is suggested.

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Please store them in the fridge to keep them fresh, they only last about a week though so I like to keep mine in the freezer and take them out a bit at a time at a time.

Ingredients:

  • 1 or 2 Sweet Potatoes

Directions:

  1. Preheat the oven to 250 degrees.
  2. Line a baking tray with parchment paper.
  3. Wash and dry your sweet potatoes.
  4. Cut the sweet potato in half, lay the flat side on the cutting board and cut into slices about 1/3 to 1/4 inches thick (no thinner then 1/4 inches).
  5. Lay the slices out on the parchment paper and bake for 3 hours, turning over once after an hour and a half.
  6. Remove from tray and place on a cooling rack until cool
  7. If you want a crispier treat you can put them back in the oven for another half hour or so, but watch for browning!

Low Impact Agility – Week 1!

I am just so impressed, so impressed!  Three dogs, all seniors, two of which have never even been to a class of any kind, and by the end of one session they were all doing small courses!

These guys are the perfect example of older dogs still enjoying learning, and being active – look at them go!

Doing activities like this keeps the brain and body moving, something important for all dogs, but older dogs in particular.  And in the meantime they are practicing heeling and looking to their owners for directions and clues.

Many of these activities are based off the Wag It Games Obstacle Skills and I am so excited to be offering this in the area.  Stay tuned to see more!

 

Find it!

We just started a Scent Class for reactive dogs, and two weeks in I am not only impressed at how great the dogs and their owners are doing, I’m also excited by the positive feedback we’re already getting.

I’m hearing how the dogs have more confidence, how they are happier, how they are sleeping after class and excited to get into the car and come back – it is wonderful and total reinforcement of why I do what I do.  So happy to be helping dogs, particularly dogs who do not always get included in things outside of basic behavior.

This is a video I put together from the scent runs on our first week of class – some of these dogs had never tried scent work before and by the end of the hour they were consistently identifying the boxes, and better yet, they were excited to work!

Such a great group of dogs and people!

 

 

Tell your dog he is handsome . . .

Tell your dog he is handsome . . .
Yesterday I was at the vet, and as there was a long wait we spent some time in the lobby practicing our sits, our downs, and getting lots of treats.  It is hard for dogs to be bored, and even harder for them to be bored when they are in a stressful place, surrounded by distractions.  The Elkhound knows things happen at the vet that he does not like, his nails get trimmed, they take his temperature, they put him on the ::gasp:: scale . . . none of these things are fun and while he does handle it with as much grace as an almost 14 year old dog can muster, any chance for him to head to the door he will take.  And he needs his space from other dogs to make it even more of an adventure.  So keeping him distracted and focused on me is important, even if it means letting him eat treats directly from the bag as the techs try to find and trim his front dewclaw.  But I digress . . .
As I was sitting in the lobby telling my dog how amazing and handsome he is, one of the receptionists, who has been there for years stopped, paused, and told me how nice that was to hear.  I looked at her shocked, I mean, clearly my dog is incredibly handsome.  Amazing is debatable at times but he had just saved me and the entire building from a squirrel who ran by the window by barking at it and driving it away, so, clearly at that point he was amazing.  Clearly.  But I thanked her and told her he may not always listen, but he is always handsome, so, of course I am going to let him know.  And then she told me something that made me a little sad, she said they do not normally hear things like that in the lobby, and it was just nice to hear someone saying nice things to their dog.
But the thing is I know you all love your dogs, and you all say nice things at home – but why not at the vet?  From now on I propose we tell our pets how great they are, no matter where we are.  You can deny it all you want but I know you are probably talking baby talk and snuggling away in the privacy of your home, but bring that love out into the world.  Particularly at a time when your dog probably needs to hear happy things the most, like at the vets, in the car, or at the groomer.  Maybe it is embarrassing, or maybe you think it will distract the other dogs, or maybe you think you have to be serious to be taken seriously as a dog owner, or maybe you are just distracted.  I get it, and sometimes that is me too.  It took having a dog who needed reassurance and monitoring to get me to where I realized the benefits of talking to my dog, and feeding him treats, and telling him he was awesome were all worth looking silly, or being loud.  Giving compliments and hugs and snuggles took vet visits from a chore to a chance for bonding time, and yes, we would both rather be somewhere else, and yeah, no amount of treats and soothing words will convince him that a nail trim is fun, but a bag full of liver treats fed with a happy word makes it better for both of us, and apparently it does not happen as much as it should.
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So tell your dog he is handsome.  Tell her she is smart.  Tell him he is sassy.  And yeah, sometimes they are a jerk and needing three pokes with the needle to draw blood may be considered karmic justice for bopping the tech in the face with their paw during the nail trim, but tell them that in a loving tone too with lots of hugs.