Daisie!

Daisie came into our lives when her life turned upside down, and we were happy to have a spot for her.  Daisie arrived a little stressed and unsure, which translated into an easily excitable dog, which meant there were lots and lots of walks that first day helping her burn some of that excitement off.  And after a few days she and Tabby got to hang out a little, although Tabby was not so sure about a new dog . . .

Thankfully Daisie was a good walker, and a quick learner.  She knew the basics (although her recall seemed to require some negotiation), and what she needed most was time and understanding as she found her way.

Daisie was not perfect but she was pretty close, house trained, pretty good on the leash, trustworthy in the house and social with other dogs.  We did have to work on her interest in the cats but calling her name and giving her treats when she caught sight of one reminded her it was more fun NOT to chase.  She also was a bit of a jumper when she got excited, and a demand barking so helping her remember that she was going to get more attention when she was sitting or standing with four on the floor helped.  The demand barking . . . well, dogs are allowed to get excited when it was time for a walk right?

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But poor Daisie lived with a dog trainer so we did have to work on some skills, we practiced sitting to be leashed, we practiced sitting and waiting for her food dish, we practiced check-ins and look backs and lots and lots of recall work.  After she settled in I took her a few places to practice meeting people politely and see how she did with her dog/dog introductions.  I prepped for the long-haul and as fate would have it not even two weeks in I received an application for her.  A nice family with two kids, and a dog savvy cat.  I was not sure how Daisie did with kids but agreed to a home visit with her, and as the kids came out of the house I saw her get far more wiggly and excited to see them then she ever was to see me.  She clearly enjoyed the meet and greet and I was thrilled when they asked if they could take her on trial placement.

Daisie has been with them for two days now and so far so good.  Peppertree Rescue who I foster for places dogs on a two week trial so dogs get a chance to settle into a home and show their true personality.  We still have some time and she is still settling and getting to know them, and they are getting to know her, but I am hopeful for her that she may have found her forever home.

Saying farewell . . .

Our world is a little quieter, and our carpets are a little less furry, as Shadow, also known as Yaddo, has left us.

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It started with an episode in the middle of the night where he became distressed and listless, a trip to the Emergency Vet revealed fluid around his heart and while a cause could not be determined it was most likely caused by a tumor.  We brought him home to spoil him rotten, hoping for the best but preparing for good-byes.

Good-byes came just a few days later, same circumstances, same trip to the vet, although this trip had a brief stop for cheeseburgers.  When you offer an Elkhound a cheeseburger and they do not take it, you know it is their time.  It was his time, who knew a heart as big as his could give out.  It was not an easy March for us, but we are healing.

When you adopt a senior you know time is limited, and I have learned that you just have to embrace every day.  It is easy to get caught up on keeping them healthy, or keeping them safe, but you cannot forget the fun, the love and the laughter.  With a senior dog, with all dogs really, it is about quality, not quantity, and I am proud to say we made every day we had count.  Shadow had lots of walks, lots of cookies, lots of cuddles, and lots and lots of laughter for three glorious years.  Could he have been trimmer?  Yes.  Better behaved?   Undoubtedly.  Could I have done more medically?  Probably.  But could he have been happier?  No, I don’t think he could of.  Well, no, he would have been much happier if we left him raid the recycling bin and eat the cat food whenever he wanted to, but there are limits, this is not anarchy.

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Shadow was a constant reminder to stay humble, be creative, and laugh.  Because if you did not laugh at his antics your other option was to yell, or to cry, and laughing was so much better.  He would generally laugh along with you, Shadow never took himself too seriously either.

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I have no words of wisdom on handling grief, no poems, not even flowery prose.  I just encourage everyone to hug their dogs a little bit longer, to feed them that extra piece of cheese, and try to find the humor in even their naughtiest behavior.

 

Tell your dog he is handsome . . .

Tell your dog he is handsome . . .
Yesterday I was at the vet, and as there was a long wait we spent some time in the lobby practicing our sits, our downs, and getting lots of treats.  It is hard for dogs to be bored, and even harder for them to be bored when they are in a stressful place, surrounded by distractions.  The Elkhound knows things happen at the vet that he does not like, his nails get trimmed, they take his temperature, they put him on the ::gasp:: scale . . . none of these things are fun and while he does handle it with as much grace as an almost 14 year old dog can muster, any chance for him to head to the door he will take.  And he needs his space from other dogs to make it even more of an adventure.  So keeping him distracted and focused on me is important, even if it means letting him eat treats directly from the bag as the techs try to find and trim his front dewclaw.  But I digress . . .
As I was sitting in the lobby telling my dog how amazing and handsome he is, one of the receptionists, who has been there for years stopped, paused, and told me how nice that was to hear.  I looked at her shocked, I mean, clearly my dog is incredibly handsome.  Amazing is debatable at times but he had just saved me and the entire building from a squirrel who ran by the window by barking at it and driving it away, so, clearly at that point he was amazing.  Clearly.  But I thanked her and told her he may not always listen, but he is always handsome, so, of course I am going to let him know.  And then she told me something that made me a little sad, she said they do not normally hear things like that in the lobby, and it was just nice to hear someone saying nice things to their dog.
But the thing is I know you all love your dogs, and you all say nice things at home – but why not at the vet?  From now on I propose we tell our pets how great they are, no matter where we are.  You can deny it all you want but I know you are probably talking baby talk and snuggling away in the privacy of your home, but bring that love out into the world.  Particularly at a time when your dog probably needs to hear happy things the most, like at the vets, in the car, or at the groomer.  Maybe it is embarrassing, or maybe you think it will distract the other dogs, or maybe you think you have to be serious to be taken seriously as a dog owner, or maybe you are just distracted.  I get it, and sometimes that is me too.  It took having a dog who needed reassurance and monitoring to get me to where I realized the benefits of talking to my dog, and feeding him treats, and telling him he was awesome were all worth looking silly, or being loud.  Giving compliments and hugs and snuggles took vet visits from a chore to a chance for bonding time, and yes, we would both rather be somewhere else, and yeah, no amount of treats and soothing words will convince him that a nail trim is fun, but a bag full of liver treats fed with a happy word makes it better for both of us, and apparently it does not happen as much as it should.
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So tell your dog he is handsome.  Tell her she is smart.  Tell him he is sassy.  And yeah, sometimes they are a jerk and needing three pokes with the needle to draw blood may be considered karmic justice for bopping the tech in the face with their paw during the nail trim, but tell them that in a loving tone too with lots of hugs.

Owen

Owen is the one that started it all.  My first official dog.  While Fluff was my partner and Yaddo is my buddy, Owen was my heart.  Skinny, sick, with no ACLs and hip dysplasia Owen came to me broken down as a foster dog, and watching him heal was a privilege I will be forever grateful for.  We worked through his dog reactivity, we obtained our Canine Good Citizen certification and when it became obvious that his health issues were not something we could overcome we started a bucket list and lived every day to the fullest.